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Thread: How to manage connecting multiple systems to one TV ?

  1. #1
    Insert Coin (Level 0)
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    Default How to manage connecting multiple systems to one TV ?

    Hi,
    Any have any advice on how to properly manage connecting a bunch of systems to one TV set ?

    Right now everytime I want to play/test a new find,
    got to unplug the video connector and PS and get
    out the other system's parts and connect them.
    I do this so I don't seperate the parts out and the older
    Atari and INTV can't use the autoswitch box that NES/SNES use.

    Also everything ends up as a sphagetti of wires
    when you have like 4-5 systems sitting in front of the TV.

    How do you manage ? Seen some nicely done Room of Dooms. Is there a Audio/Video switch box I can plug everything into ? Should I wirewrap all the loose cables together to prevent the mess of wires all over ?
    Must do the route

  2. #2
    Great Puma (Level 12) Gamereviewgod's Avatar
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    Yep, look at any electronics store for an AV switchbox. There are, obviously, multiple brands depending on your needs. You didn't say how your systems are conncted, but there are some for composite, S-video, and component.

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    Kirby (Level 13) ubersaurus's Avatar
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    I also know that you can find video selectors online for RF only consoles. Personally I use a series of A/B switchers for all my RF consoles, which works out well enough, if not a bit time consuming to set up.
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  4. #4
    Insert Coin (Level 0)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamereviewgod
    Yep, look at any electronics store for an AV switchbox. There are, obviously, multiple brands depending on your needs. You didn't say how your systems are conncted, but there are some for composite, S-video, and component.
    Thanks for the info, I hope it is cheap !
    I use the TV's RCA A/V inputs for some games, as that is the only cable I have (ie SNES) for it, while other times I use the manual switchbox (Atari) and connect to the cable TV input on the TV, and other times I use the auto switchbox for the NES into the cable TV input.
    Must do the route

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    ServBot (Level 11) s1lence's Avatar
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    Most are around 20-30 bucks for a good one.
    Here is an example of one, but there are ones from pelican (if I remember) that are better. http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage....=1076628516373.

    I keep forgetting to get a couple more.
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    Insert Coin (Level 0) The-Bavis's Avatar
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    I use the Pelican System Selector Pro ($80 @ Gamestop). This won't help you with RF only hookups, though. I only have NES and forward hooked up for use normally. It is well worth the $80. I have my consoles hooked up in my main TV room, with DVD, VCR, etc and it is a nice and clean set-up for this situation. If you have a huge room of doom or older consoles (non A/V or better) then it won't work for you. It can handle S-Video, composite, ethernet, and some optic cables.

    Only complaint is that it comes with premade labels, so if you have anything that is pre N64 or PS1, you have to use the labels that say "Game Console" or "Other". Comes with all current gen system labels.
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  7. #7
    Apple (Level 5)
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    My primary TV is set up as follows:

    TV's component input: PS2

    Reciever: Marantz SR7500 7.1 connected to TV S-vid input

    2 AV Switchboxes connected to Reciever:

    1.) All S-vid:
    -Xbox
    -Gamecube
    -Dreamcast

    2.) All Composite
    -SNES
    -Genesis
    -Neo Fami
    -Saturn

    Then I've got an Afterburner-modded GBA in a little holster attached to the couch, for when I need a 3-minute Wario Ware fix during TV commercial breaks

  8. #8
    Pac-Man (Level 10) Promophile's Avatar
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    I actually got a flatscreen 36incher for 100something dollars a few months ago and it comes with 3 AV inputs so all I have to do is turn on the systems and switch to whichever AV channel the system is on. Currently have X-box on 1, PS2 on 2 and gamecube on 3.

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    I have a cheap ass little switcher with just three inputs. I use them for Nintendo, Sega, and Sony. The Nintendo A/V stays in there, and I just switch them from the backs of the system depending on if I'm playing SNES, N64, or GameCube. Same goes for the Sony A/V for PlayStation and PlayStation 2. The Sega input is usually Dreamcast, but I'll unplug it sometimes for Genesis/Sega CD audio (and occasionally other stuff like the DVD player and MVS audio). I get the video for my Genesis/Sega CD from the RF, which is also shared with the NES. I have power strips to handle all the plugs. The MVS gets hooked up straight to the TV for S-video.

    Sounds like a lot of hassle, but we've made it as easy as it can possibly get without spending the money for new things for the set-up.

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    Ryu Hayabusa (Level 16) rbudrick's Avatar
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    I've got about 30 something systems hooke to my TV and it is a MESS. There's 8-way rf splitters, signal amplifiers, VCRs, converters of all kinds...chaos. Well, atleast it looks good from the front.

    It is a very good idea to tag label the ends of all your cords so you don't have to follow the leads back to the system to see which one they go in.

    I have seriously been thinking of constructing a 50 system switch box.

    Anyone got any idea for parts?

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  11. #11
    Insert Coin (Level 0)
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    Thx for the input, it is the Atari/INTV/CV that are the pain. I think I can do what someone suggested for the newer systems, buy an extra NES video switch and just unplug for the new systems that can support it, just those older ones are a pain.
    Must do the route

  12. #12

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    I picked up a 16-port AV switcher from the local community college surplus sale for $10. It works for the more modern systems, but I still have a coax switcher for the older consoles/computers.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by loporjai2003
    Thx for the input, it is the Atari/INTV/CV that are the pain. I think I can do what someone suggested for the newer systems, buy an extra NES video switch and just unplug for the new systems that can support it, just those older ones are a pain.
    Get you a 4 way RCA switch box. Run of your RF games to it. Run the cable out of it and then hook it up like you hook your RF games up (with a cable adapter or whatever). Should work like a charm! I have my 2600/Intellivision/Stunt Cycle hooked up this way.

  14. #14
    Ryu Hayabusa (Level 16) rbudrick's Avatar
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    I picked up a 16-port AV switcher from the local community college surplus sale for $10. It works for the more modern systems, but I still have a coax switcher for the older consoles/computers.
    16 port? Damn...

    Anyone know where I can get these..even higher numbers of port are actually better.

    And these RF switch boxes. What's the max number of systems you can hook to one of these?

    And the prices on these?

    -Rob
    The moral is, don't **** with Uncle Tim when he's been drinking!

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  16. #16
    Peach (Level 3)
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    I have my Genesis and my VCR plugged directly into the TV, and my NES, SNES, SMS, my cable, and TG-16 daisy-chained from the VCR. I have all of my composite cable (Saturn, N64, Dreamcast, Gamecube, Sega CD) consoles hooked up through a switch which is plugged directly into the TV through some fancy-ass wires.

  17. #17
    Cherry (Level 1) Red Hedgehog's Avatar
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    My TV (a recent Philips) has four inputs:
    Standard coaxial
    RCA/Component
    RCA/S-Video
    RCA (on the side - all the other inputs are in the back)

    In coaxial input I have a coaxial splitter attached where I can choose between A and B inputs. The A input currently has the antenna (I cancelled my cable service because I just wasn't getting my money's worth). The B input currently has nothing, but is for one day when I get an Atari, Colecovision or INTV.

    My PS2 is hooked up to the component inputs. If I get an X-Box, Gamecube, or next gen system I'll buy a component switch box.

    I have a radio shack S-Video 4-way switchbox hooked up to the S-Video (and stereo RCA) input. The switchbox can take input either from S-Video or RCA video so I have my SNES and N64 (S-Video) hooked up to it as well as my SMS and Genesis (RCA). The switchbox came with blank stickers so I was able to label each button on the switchbox correctly as well as attach labeled stickers to each system' wires.

    My NES is currently hooked up to the RCA-only input. If I get another RCA/S-Video system (TG16, hopefully) I'll have to get another switchbox and may just segregate between RCA and S-Video systems.
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  18. #18
    drowning in medals Ed Oscuro's Avatar
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    These "switchers" you speak of would be more useful to me if I actually had room for more than two consoles on the top of my console stacks...

  19. #19
    Peach (Level 3)
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    For what it's worth - you CAN daisy chain the 4 way switchers - that's how I have mine hooked up. Granted I don't own 50 consoles (that's be a heck of a lot daisy chaining), but all I need to do is hit a couple of buttons and I'm good to go. I even made some labels so they are descriptive and easy to remember.

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