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View Full Version : Is Sumo Digital better or worse than Hitmaker?



josekortez
07-11-2008, 10:41 PM
If you don't know what I'm talking about, after Hitmaker left Sega, Sumo Digital took over a few Sega franchises including Virtua Tennis and Outrun and developed Sega Superstars Tennis.

Hitmaker brought us Crazy Taxi 1-3 and Virtua Tennis 1&2 and a few other games including Amazing Island on the GameCube, Astro Boy on the Game Boy Advance (co-developed with Treasure) and Virtual-On Marz on PlayStation 2. Last I heard, Hitmaker had developed a PSP RPG called Dragoneer's Aria.

After doing some research, I discovered that Sumo Digital is a European developer that has no classic ties to Sega. However, all the reviews of Virtua Tennis 3 have been positive, so I'm wondering who here, if anyone, likes Sumo Digital better than Hitmaker.

Also, why did Hitmaker leave Sega? I still think Hitmaker was a better developer...

Leo_A
07-11-2008, 10:47 PM
Sumo Digital by far. Odd question though, why did you ask it?

I think OutRun is Sega's best franchise though, so I'm biased toward the company that brought several nice conversions of the last two titles home. I don't think I've played any of their other work.

I wasn't aware Hitmaker left Sega. Was my understanding they were a internal development studio for Sega, and currently go under the name of AM3. That isn't the case? I was never crazy about anything they've produced anyways.

Chuplayer
07-11-2008, 11:11 PM
They made the PS2 version of Outrun 2006 look like an XBOX game while still having it be completely playable. They automatically rule.

roushimsx
07-11-2008, 11:29 PM
They made the PS2 version of Outrun 2006 look like an XBOX game while still having it be completely playable. They automatically rule.

This a thousand times over and before that, they did an amazing job of porting Outrun 2 to the Xbox in the first place, what with the limited RAM and all vs. the arcade counterpart. Amazing work from those fellows and I can't think of any of their port jobs that I wasn't impressed by.

They're far better as a porting house than as a dev house, but I still enjoy checking out their solo efforts whenever I stumble on one on the cheap. Speaking of which, bad reviews be damned, I need to get around to picking up Driver '76 one of these days. FWIW, I don't believe they actually developed Virtua Tennis 3, they "only" handled the console ports while AM3/Hitmaker did the original game.

I didn't realize that Sega had changed Hitmaker's name back to AM3. Thank god, I always preferred the AM naming scheme to the names everyone other than AM2 had adopted during the Dreamcast era.

SpaceHarrier
07-11-2008, 11:56 PM
They made the PS2 version of Outrun 2006 look like an XBOX game while still having it be completely playable. They automatically rule.

Truth ^^^^

As much as I love Crazy Taxi, the port of my favorite racing game EVER gives the upper hand to Sumo Digital. I have both the PS2 and PSP versions, and I never tire of playing either version.

josekortez
07-12-2008, 10:11 AM
Sumo Digital by far. Odd question though, why did you ask it?


I know it's a strange question, but usually whenever another developer tries to follow up a franchise started by the original, they usually screw it up, but I haven't played a Sumo Digital game yet that wasn't airtight. It just kind of came to me while playing Outrun 2006: Coast 2 Coast last night.

I know Crazy Taxi is my favorite game of all time and I don't think any other studio could do the franchise justice. I wouldn't even want to play a Crazy Taxi by anyone other than Hitmaker.

Xexyz
07-12-2008, 04:59 PM
You know, this topic does lead to an interesting question. Who is Hitmaker, the company that made Dragoneer's Aria? Was it formed by ex-Sega employees who happened to be part of Hitmaker/AM3 before it was dissolved? Or are they just some small company with no employee relations to Sega?

roushimsx
07-12-2008, 05:30 PM
You know, this topic does lead to an interesting question. Who is Hitmaker, the company that made Dragoneer's Aria? Was it formed by ex-Sega employees who happened to be part of Hitmaker/AM3 before it was dissolved? Or are they just some small company with no employee relations to Sega?

That's "Hit Maker", a totally different company. I guess it's ok because Hitmaker isn't in use anymore, they added that space, and they capitalized the M....yea. Something like that.

Just skimming the credits it looks like:
Production Director: Yukihiko Hojo -> Ex Capcom (Dino Crisis 3, Resident Evil GC)
Chief Director & Game Design: Hiroyuki Maruhama -> Ex Capcom (Dino Crisis 3)
Director: Hiroaki Suzuki -> All over the place (Tales of Legendia, Dragon Warrior VII, Shenmue, Sonic Blast)
Art Design: Moriyoshi Ohara -> All over the place (Blue Dragon, Extermination)
Character Design: Juno Jeong -> NCSoft (Lineage)

...which should be enough to clear up any confusion between the two companies.

edit -> and just to reiterate: Sumo Digital should be in charge of every home conversion for every Sega arcade game (AM2/AM3/etc). AM2 lost the right to play ball when they fouled on Virtua Fighter 2 on PS2. :'(

Borman
07-12-2008, 07:05 PM
Because of Outrun 2, I love Sumo Digital. Even the PC port is solid (which says a lot, since Im using Cider to play it in OSX and its still damn amazing)

j_factor
07-12-2008, 10:40 PM
The "new" AM3 isn't just Hitmaker, it's the product of a merged Hitmaker and Sega Rosso (AM5). Sega Rosso had made Sega Rally, Cosmic Smash, and Initial D. Despite this, the last Sega Rally game was made by a new development team located in Europe (since dissolved).

Sumo Digital is good at doing ports, but they've made few games of their own. So far I do like them, though. I wish they'd done a port of Ollie King.

roushimsx
07-12-2008, 11:11 PM
Despite this, the last Sega Rally game was made by a new development team located in Europe (since dissolved).

Thank god Codemasters picked up the whole team. Sega's loss is Codemaster's gain.

j_factor
07-12-2008, 11:55 PM
Thank god Codemasters picked up the whole team. Sega's loss is Codemaster's gain.

Well I don't totally blame Sega. Although the fans were happy with the game, it sold very poorly.