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View Full Version : How do you do your modding/Tips for modding



NESCollector75
01-20-2003, 12:33 AM
I am intrested to know how you do your modding, and if you have any tips for modding. A certain website with information could be helpful. The modding I am intrested in is Painting systems, changing the L.E.D. Etc.

Please do not post anything about Mod chips

Thank you!

CrazyImpmon
01-20-2003, 03:20 AM
It's really about imagination and having the right tools. I have a metallic blue GBA for over a year now. And despite a few scruffs, it hasn't shown the original color at all.

Changing LED depends on the original LED. Some like GBA would be hard as they uses surface mounted LED. And dual color LED are rarely available in other color beside red/green. Others like DC and GC is easy.

For best result in painting, you may have to completely dissemble the console, carefully remove every single stickers if you want to put it back on and using the right kind of paint. I used enamel paint for my GBA for durability. (about $3 for an itty-bitty 3 oz can)

Major alteration like making Colecovision Jr requires tools to alter and change and some careful gluing to put the pices back together. And an outright facelift would require experience and equipment in injection molding to make custom case.

autobotracing
01-20-2003, 09:12 AM
I can help with all the painting questions.


The main tip I can give you is take your time and make sure you clean it good before you spray.Another thing is do light coats because if you dont it will look like ass. lmk if you have any questions.

omnedon
01-20-2003, 09:25 PM
Omnedon's number one modding tip!

Avoid using your "main" or "best" console for your first attempt at anything. Try it on an ugly guinea pig first, and learn those lessons!

8-)

CrazyImpmon
01-21-2003, 01:21 AM
One more thing I forgot: when doing detail works (ie painting stripes or carving small details) lay off of any caffinated drink for at least 6 hours before! :D

WiseSalesman
01-21-2003, 11:22 AM
@CrazyImp: You spoke about changing the LEDs. Only thing is, all the LEDs lying around in my basement are much, MUCH dimmer than the ones in my consoles. Also, the one in my DC, for instance, is white but emits an orange glow. All the LEDs I have emit white light filtered thorugh colored plastic. How do I figure out the right kind of LED to use, so I can make sure that the system can power it and everything? The ones I would be interested in changing are the DC and the GC. Thanks.

Happy_Dude
01-21-2003, 11:33 AM
The D.C has a high intensity L.E.D. They are all clear :)
You can pick them up at (insert electronic store here) :D

When installing make sure it's in the right way :/ thats the only
thing that could go wrong (and it's not major, if you do just turn it around ;) )

NESCollector75
01-21-2003, 07:37 PM
For painting do you use an airbrush to do it? Also do you use a primar or a sealer, Im thinking of painting an NES or N64, and was thinking about changing the LED in my dreamcast. Thanks

CrazyImpmon
01-21-2003, 08:33 PM
@CrazyImp: You spoke about changing the LEDs. Only thing is, all the LEDs lying around in my basement are much, MUCH dimmer than the ones in my consoles. Also, the one in my DC, for instance, is white but emits an orange glow. All the LEDs I have emit white light filtered thorugh colored plastic. How do I figure out the right kind of LED to use, so I can make sure that the system can power it and everything? The ones I would be interested in changing are the DC and the GC. Thanks.

The LEDs you have are probably the older variety. Some early LED were rather dim and not practical other than a simple indicator light. I have a number of them and even when paced with a 9v! battery, they're nowhere near as bright as modern LED.

Modern LEDs are high efficieny LED and can be very bright when the right voltage and current's applied. They are typically in clear case although there may be a white or colored diffused case to spread the light a bit more.

Typical red, orange, amber, and green LED are 2v 20mA. Blue and white usually have higher requirement (like 3-3.5v) and won't shine quite as brightly if you simply swap the older LED. If you have a voltmeter, check the voltage across the LED while the console's on and check the specs if the LED you're going to use. If the LED you're going to use has .5v more than the available voltage, you may need to find the current limiting resistor and replace it with something smaller. The formula for finding the required resistor size is: rersistor = (source volt - LED volt)/LED current.

The voltage supplying the power on LED is probably 5v before the resistor and assume the blue LED you're going to use is 3.7v, that will get you 1.3v/LED current. The blue LED typically requires 20mA (almost all LED uses 20mA anyway) and that will give you 1.3/.02 (*you will need to convert mA to amp) and the result would be 65 ohm is required for optimal light. If the resistor is too low, the LED would burn too brightly, get rather warm and eventually burn out. If you use too high resistance, the LED won't be bright at all.

If the new LED has lower voltage requirement than the supply voltage, you will need to increase the resistance. Use the same formula above to determine the resistor size. And if the calculated ressitor size is at or near zero, then you don't need resistor.

When replacing the LED, observe the polarity of the LED. It's important as LED will function only one way. If you look at the clear LED, you will see what appears to be 2 element with very find wire connecting it (the wire may be visible only under magnification) The element that's twice as big as the other are cathode and is always connected to negative or ground and the other small element is the anode and always connect to positive. The length of leads and the flat side are the other indicator of anode or cathode.

When removing the old LED, mark which is + or - and then just heat the solder pads while using tweezer to remove the old LED. It's especially important when removing surface mounted LED not to let the solder or the circuit board get too hot or the traces may start to peel away and make a simple work extra hard.

Trim the leads off the new LED and use tweezer to solder it in place. Add fresh solder if needed. Repeat if you need to replace the resistor. (Resistor are not polarity senstive so don't worry) Turn the system on and pray you did it all right.

If you want to have a little extra fun with Gamecube, you can find a dual color LED with common anode or common cathode (I'd suggest cathode for simplicity), wire one lead as normal (common cathode) and add a wire to the other lead to a 2PDT switch so it's in parallel to Japan/USA mode switch.




,--|<|----o\
| Red \
--------------+ LED \o--VVV---------
Gamecube | resistor to Gamecube
&#40;common `--|<|----o &#40;anode&#41;
cathode&#41; Green
LED



That way you could have green light for one mode and red light for other mode. A quick way to tell without having to remember the switch poition or waiting until the screen comes up. Depending on the voltage requirement, you may not need to change the existing resistor on the GC.

This concludes the free class on LED basics. ;) Next week, using XBox game disc as coaster and getting away with it. LOL

*disclaimer: not responsible if anything blows up, catches on fire, indian raid, or alien invasion. It's all at you own risk.

CrazyImpmon
01-21-2003, 09:12 PM
In case you can only find a dual color LED that has only 2 leads (no common anode or common cathode) there's still a way to use it as a mode indicator but you will need to find a hex inverter (such as 7404)



| \
+--------| >o-------.
| | / |
| |
| ,----|<|---. |
| | | |
`---+ +-vvv-'
| |
`----|>|---'


One lead is connected to input of the inverter. Other lead is connected to the output through a current limiting resistor. The input goes to the center post of the switch. One side of the switch goes to vcc and other to ground.

This method is a but messier as it requires another compoment and some more wires but it can work as well if you don't want to find a color 3 leads version.


EDIT: the ASCII art came out messed up for some reason.

autobotracing
01-22-2003, 02:16 PM
For painting do you use an airbrush to do it? Also do you use a primar or a sealer, Im thinking of painting an NES or N64, and was thinking about changing the LED in my dreamcast. Thanks


you dont have to prime but it helps a little.A airbrush make for a nice finish but a quality spray paint can do the job.The key is patience and not cheap paint.The best paint is krylon it dries fast and has a glossy finish.If you use that you shouldnt need a sealer otherwise you might need to clear coat it.I painted a nes color changing red to gold .The nes is very ugly 1 color.now n64's look good any color.pm me if you have any questions Ill help you out

NESCollector75
01-26-2003, 12:02 AM
For painting do you use an airbrush to do it? Also do you use a primar or a sealer, Im thinking of painting an NES or N64, and was thinking about changing the LED in my dreamcast. Thanks


you dont have to prime but it helps a little.A airbrush make for a nice finish but a quality spray paint can do the job.The key is patience and not cheap paint.The best paint is krylon it dries fast and has a glossy finish.If you use that you shouldnt need a sealer otherwise you might need to clear coat it.I painted a nes color changing red to gold .The nes is very ugly 1 color.now n64's look good any color.pm me if you have any questions Ill help you out

Sounds good! I am going to have to wait for warmer weather before I do any spray painting, so be expecting some PM's in the spring!

Sylentwulf
01-27-2003, 04:54 PM
And the greatest Mod I've seen yet?
http://hw.metku.net/index.html?sect=view&n=1&path=mods/cryo/index_eng