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Thread: Safe voltages for systems?

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    Default Safe voltages for systems?

    I am wondering if it would be a big deal to use a 9.4v instead of a 9? What do you think the limit would be? Do different systems respond differently to different voltages? Thanks.

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    Peach (Level 3) izarate's Avatar
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    With most systems it should be fine. The internal voltage regulator will take care of the extra 0.4V. Most consoles have one.

    Depending on the regulator used by the console the range is different. The LM7805 (a very common 5V regulator) can handle up to 35V if I recall correctly.

    What are you trying to power up?
    Last edited by izarate; 06-10-2008 at 11:34 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by izarate View Post
    With most systems it should be fine. The internal voltage regulator will take care of the extra 0.4V.

    Depending on the regulator used by the console the range is different. The LM7805 (a very common 5V regulator) can handle up to 35V if I recall correctly.

    What are you trying to power up?
    I was mainly wondering about a NES, but I was also wondering about it in general. Thanks for the help.

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    An NES input is 9V AC. I seriouly doubt that 9.4V will hurt, especially since I just measured my NES adaptor and it was 10.79V AC. That's very common with AC adaptors. It's usually just an estimated "close enough" type of thing.
    Last edited by jb143; 06-10-2008 at 11:46 PM.
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    I've never had a problem with slightly over powering a NES.

    If you give it a little too much, there may be some interference and the system may hum or buzz. My friend lost his power adapter and used another one, at a higher voltage, which caused the noises, but we played it for many hours without any problems.

    The amount of power you are talking about, however, shouldn't cause any noticeable or actual problems.

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    Cool thing about the NES is that you can use a DC adapter and get away fine. The NES has a rectifier right at the voltage input.

    Oh, btw, measure a linear powerbrick under load for acurrate voltage measuring. Without a load you always get a higher reading.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evildragon View Post
    Cool thing about the NES is that you can use a DC adapter and get away fine. The NES has a rectifier right at the voltage input.
    If you use a DC adapter, what pins should be positive and negative?
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkiDragon View Post
    If you use a DC adapter, what pins should be positive and negative?
    It probally doesn't matter. It's rectified to the corrrect polarity inside the NES.
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    correct, polarity doesn't matter...

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