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Thread: Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Is it possible to open these up and repair dead ones? If so how do you get them open considering the weird security screws they use? Thanks for any help or tips anyone can help me with this as I have several. Thanks again.

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    I don't know if they can be fixed, but you should be able to pick up another one cheap.

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    Ive been meaning to try and track down the bits these things take.... as far as ive seen theres 2 different types used... but in most cases of these things youre prob better off getting a new one then tracking down these bits since some supplies just cant be fixed...
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    Yes, it's possible to repair those power supplies, but if the fault is with the transformer it won't be worth the time or trouble to repair it.
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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Thanks for the replies and info. It's good to know instead of wasting time, thanks again!

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    Usually its the cord that fails near the ends from years of being pulled on. A volt meter can verify continuance, lop off the bad end and resolder.
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    I have seen videos from the early 90s about repairing SNES power supplies so I imagine it's possible to fix certain problems but yeah it might not be cost effective at this point.

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    I've got a SNES power supply/adapter that is twitchy near where the end of the cord goes into the brick. Unless the cord is in the perfect position then I don't get any juice from it. I'm guessing the connection is just cracked from the wires to the board, but does anyone know how to open up one of those official power supply/adapters? I'd rather repair the original one than toss it and buy a replacement.

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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Thanks for the help. Does anyone know where to get the security bits they use to open them up? Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xelement5x View Post
    I've got a SNES power supply/adapter that is twitchy near where the end of the cord goes into the brick. Unless the cord is in the perfect position then I don't get any juice from it. I'm guessing the connection is just cracked from the wires to the board, but does anyone know how to open up one of those official power supply/adapters? I'd rather repair the original one than toss it and buy a replacement.
    My guess would be that the copper strands of the wire are broken. That's a high stress area and a reason they put the thicker plastic over the wire at that spot. If that's the problem, and you can get it open, then it could simply be a matter of pulling the the cord through the hole in the case, cutting the cord after the broken section, stripping the wires, and re-soldering them to their correct positions.
    "Game programmers are generally lazy individuals. That's right. It's true. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Since the dawn of computer games, game programmers have looked for shortcuts to coolness." Kurt Arnlund - Game programmer for Activision, Accolade...

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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by jb143 View Post
    My guess would be that the copper strands of the wire are broken. That's a high stress area and a reason they put the thicker plastic over the wire at that spot. If that's the problem, and you can get it open, then it could simply be a matter of pulling the the cord through the hole in the case, cutting the cord after the broken section, stripping the wires, and re-soldering them to their correct positions.
    My problem is the security screws on the power supplies. Can't find a bit to fit either. Anyone know who sells them? Thanks.

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    I'm wondering if a large spanner bit might work on those, but I don't own one to try.



    I do have a NES AC adapter that has a broken cord but I've never been bothered enough to figure this out myself.
    Last edited by Shulamana; 03-08-2012 at 06:45 AM.

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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Shulamana View Post
    I'm wondering if a large spanner bit might work on those, but I don't own one to try.



    I do have a NES AC adapter that has a broken cord but I've never been bothered enough to figure this out myself.
    I know what you mean. The security screw head is so different looking, never been able to find anything that even looks like it would work. Even tried the smallest pair of needlenose plyers with no luck. The Sega screw looks like a star type pattern with a very small post in the middle. I have seen 30 bit kits on various video game sale sites but don't want to waste money I don't have on something that might or might not work. Does anyone have one of those and knows if the work or not? Thanks!
    Last edited by thegamezmaster; 03-08-2012 at 09:34 AM.

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    Default Sega And Nintendo Power Supply Repair Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Shulamana View Post
    I'm wondering if a large spanner bit might work on those, but I don't own one to try.



    I do have a NES AC adapter that has a broken cord but I've never been bothered enough to figure this out myself.
    Does anyone know where to get one of these and what size to get to open an NES AC Adapter? Need to get to the cord for salvage,thanks.
    Last edited by thegamezmaster; 07-15-2012 at 11:20 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thegamezmaster View Post
    Does anyone know where to get one of these and what size to get to open an NES AC Adapter? Need to get to the cord for salvage,thanks.
    If you have a Harbor Freight local to you they should have it as a part of their mixed "security bit" set, shouldn't run you more than $10 out the door. Most hardware stores that sell some kind of small cheap security bit set should have that as part of the assortment.

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    I can get hold of tools for both nes power packs and genesis.

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    Do you have a dremel? It's fairly easy to make a bit like that with out of an old flathead bit. I've also heard of people having luck using the melted pen trick but I've never tried it myself. You take apart a ballpoint pen. Slightly melt the end of the tube part with a lighter. Press it onto the head of the security screw. Wait for it to harden and then unscrew. Has anyone every tried this and had it work?
    "Game programmers are generally lazy individuals. That's right. It's true. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Since the dawn of computer games, game programmers have looked for shortcuts to coolness." Kurt Arnlund - Game programmer for Activision, Accolade...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jb143 View Post
    I've also heard of people having luck using the melted pen trick but I've never tried it myself. You take apart a ballpoint pen. Slightly melt the end of the tube part with a lighter. Press it onto the head of the security screw. Wait for it to harden and then unscrew. Has anyone every tried this and had it work?

    I've done this a few times before and found it to work reasonably well. Tight screws will take a few tries and a pen will only be good for one or two uses.
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