Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: my problem with replacing 72-pin connectors on the NES

  1. #1
    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,352
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    53
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    60
    Thanked in
    56 Posts

    Default my problem with replacing 72-pin connectors on the NES

    1. They're too tight.

    2. The system is no longer original once a key component of it is replaced with a third-party connector.

    3. Most of the issues with connectivity can be solved simply by applying rubbing alcohol to a game cartridge and pulling the cartridge in and out of the system repeatedly and moving it up and down. If you read any service manual for the console, it says one should be cleaning the system periodically- granted it says one needs the Nintendo brand cleaner system, but this method will work, and most people are doing goofy things like boiling the 72 pin or bending the pins, making them even less functional.

    The design of the console was flawed but it was built to last. I have a system in front of me that was built between 1985 and 1990 with original capacitors, pins, etc and works fine.

    It upsets me to see so many eBay listings advertising "new 72 pin." And with the HDMI mod, there will be even less consoles in their original condition.

  2. #2
    Great Puma (Level 12) YoshiM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    4,164
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    19
    Thanked in
    19 Posts
    Xbox LIVE
    YoshiDM
    PSN
    YoshiDM
    3DS Friend
    0860-4642-4923

    Default

    I think I bought new Nintendo OEM pins from someone on this forum years back. And it works as advertised!

    So the original stuff is out there.

  3. #3
    Ghostbuster
    Greg2600's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Soprano Land, NJ
    Posts
    3,503
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    24
    Thanked in
    23 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    3. Most of the issues with connectivity can be solved simply by applying rubbing alcohol to a game cartridge and pulling the cartridge in and out of the system repeatedly and moving it up and down. If you read any service manual for the console, it says one should be cleaning the system periodically- granted it says one needs the Nintendo brand cleaner system, but this method will work, and most people are doing goofy things like boiling the 72 pin or bending the pins, making them even less functional.
    Goofy? Boiling the connector worked PERFECTLY for me. I had replaced mine with aftermarket ones which I hated. Too stiff/tight, and still had issues. Took it out, boiled the original, and put the original back in.
    The Paunch Stevenson Show free Internet podcast - www.paunchstevenson.com - DP FEEDBACK

  4. #4
    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,352
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    53
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    60
    Thanked in
    56 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg2600 View Post
    Goofy? Boiling the connector worked PERFECTLY for me. I had replaced mine with aftermarket ones which I hated. Too stiff/tight, and still had issues. Took it out, boiled the original, and put the original back in.
    I meant goofy in the context that there is a much simpler and quicker method that works just as well.

  5. #5
    ServBot (Level 11) Niku-Sama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Deadford, OR
    Posts
    3,684
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    25
    Thanked in
    23 Posts

    Default

    I've only not been able to save the old connector once or twice. normally I bend them back and they are good for a long time or you don't even have to push them down any more. I remember one that the metal had lost all of its spring and was real brittle and crispy. it was odd, not rusted or any thing either. it was like something you would see if it had been heated up and cooled off a bunch of times but temps to make that happen would have melted plastic and the rest of it was in good shape.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Moderator
    Custom rank graphic
    Aussie2B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    8,753
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    8
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    101
    Thanked in
    80 Posts

    Default

    I'm not a fan at all of third party replacement connectors either. I feel they're just a temporary fix that ultimately leaves you in a worse position than where you started. They're so tight that having a game in there will loosen them over time to the point that you eventually end up in the same position of having a loose connection, except, in the process of getting to that point, shoving in and yanking out games when it's really tight will permanently thin the contacts on your games, making it that much harder to maintain a solid connection.

  7. #7
    Kirby (Level 13) megasdkirby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Bayamon, Puerto Rico
    Posts
    5,138
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    9
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    6
    Thanked in
    5 Posts
    Xbox LIVE
    megasdkirby
    PSN
    megasdkirby

    Default

    What about the blinking light win?
    Game Wants: http://www.digitpress.com/forum/showthread.php?t=121467
    Completed US CIB Collections: Atari 7800, Neo Geo Pocket Color
    Quote Originally Posted by portnoyd View Post
    Jesus christ. Half the internet is truly retarded.

  8. #8
    FPGA arm-based system Custom rank graphic
    bb_hood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    2,067
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    39
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    20
    Thanked in
    19 Posts
    PSN
    bb_hood99

    Default

    Ive seen many NES systems where the pins were absolutely shot.
    If you want your NES to be functional, sometimes you just need to replace the pins.

    I agree that most or all replacement pins are of low quality, but what can you do.

    A working nes with good pins + flash cart is all you need to play without trouble.
    If you are constantly inserting/removing carts you will encounter problems at some point.

  9. #9
    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,352
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    53
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    60
    Thanked in
    56 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by megasdkirby View Post
    What about the blinking light win?
    A video review by Game Historian talked about how the BLW had a death grip on his carts and only worked 9/10 times.

    It's been out for a few years now so I don't know if that has changed but I'm not sold. If I absolutely have to mod my NES, I want something that works 99%+ of the time and is not going to wear down the PCB contacts on my cartridges.

    I did just watch a review video and the guy did 5+ different carts and they all started on the first try.

  10. #10
    Insert Coin (Level 0)
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    68
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    A video review by Game Historian talked about how the BLW had a death grip on his carts and only worked 9/10 times.

    It's been out for a few years now so I don't know if that has changed but I'm not sold. If I absolutely have to mod my NES, I want something that works 99%+ of the time and is not going to wear down the PCB contacts on my cartridges.

    I did just watch a review video and the guy did 5+ different carts and they all started on the first try.
    Although I typically play on my AV famicom, I have a blinking light win in my regular NES I can say it's totally worth it, It's failure rate is right with my AV famicom so as long as a game doesn't need to be cleaned it'll boot right up & it's design will last way longer than replacement connectors or refurbishing your connectors because it won't eventually get stretched out again, & it's not really "modding" your NES because you can slap the old connector and hinge back in about 5 minutes, the assembly is super easy and reversable. The death grip is a bit overstated too imo it's not really that much harder to pull out than any other cartridge based system I own the only difference is they're 20 plus years old and designed vertically so they're easier to grab, brand new connectors on a SNES, N64, or Genesis would probably be a little tight as well.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to drunk3nj3sus For This Useful Post:

    gbpxl (01-12-2018)

  12. #11
    ServBot (Level 11) Niku-Sama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Deadford, OR
    Posts
    3,684
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    2
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    25
    Thanked in
    23 Posts

    Default

    since we are on the topic of the blinking light win I have to ask.

    how does one feel about using it to replace a pin connector in a Sharp NES tv?

    do you feel it will ruin the authenticity of the item or would it upgrade it?

    just something I have been toying around with, as most people know if the pins are bad you would need to bend them back a few times but in a NES tv they are a pain to get to, pretty much disassemble the whole tv to get to it...

  13. #12
    ServBot (Level 11) Custom rank graphic
    Cornelius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wrong Place, Wrong Time
    Posts
    3,774
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    72
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    25
    Thanked in
    24 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Niku-Sama View Post
    since we are on the topic of the blinking light win I have to ask.

    how does one feel about using it to replace a pin connector in a Sharp NES tv?

    do you feel it will ruin the authenticity of the item or would it upgrade it?

    just something I have been toying around with, as most people know if the pins are bad you would need to bend them back a few times but in a NES tv they are a pain to get to, pretty much disassemble the whole tv to get to it...
    IMO, hang onto the original and there's no problem. It is completely reversible, so I don't see a problem.

  14. #13
    16-bits, yo Custom rank graphic
    BlastProcessing402's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,282
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    7
    Thanked in
    5 Posts

    Default

    Blowing fixes all. No it doesn't corrode or anything, or my 30+ year NES/games would have long since shown the problem. It hasn't.

  15. #14
    Kirby (Level 13) Tanooki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    5,957
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    3
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    I meant goofy in the context that there is a much simpler and quicker method that works just as well.
    No it doesn't. Boiling is far more effective on a dirty set of pins that may have never been or rarely been cleaned. If someone would have maintained cleanliness at a periodic rate then yes it's overkill. But buying second hand assume the worst.

    It's not hard to boil water with a paper towel in the bottom, drop in the pins for 5min, then pull out and use a cleaning kit (or like) wedge into the pins and in-out that a dozen times until it comes away clean before stopping the 5min dunking again. The last time I did it the first rub of the pins had large amounts of gray nasty looking goo come off the connector using the plain OEM Nintendo Cleaning Kit (with alcohol) could not remove and it repeatedly failed as such. 2 dunks to remove the goo, that system has run like a fine watch without fail ever since for the last year.

    There's nothing goofy about a process that works the best. Using after market brittle crap cheap chinese metal pins will cause you far more problems than that.

Similar Threads

  1. PSP 3004 interlacing problem worth replacing the lcd?
    By insinion in forum Modern Gaming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-31-2013, 11:15 AM
  2. Save Battery replacing problem
    By NBaco in forum Technical and Restoration Society
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-27-2011, 03:09 PM
  3. Odd problem while replacing snes cart batteries
    By Ryuoken in forum Technical and Restoration Society
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-12-2008, 06:23 PM
  4. Guitar Hero Controller Problem - Replacing the whammy bar
    By Slate in forum Technical and Restoration Society
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-30-2007, 01:51 PM
  5. Replacing Batteries in SNES carts, and NES 72 Pin connectors
    By mizarkgram in forum Technical and Restoration Society
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-02-2004, 06:05 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •