Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Is there any advantage of using RF connections?

  1. #1
    Strawberry (Level 2)
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    432
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    16
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default Is there any advantage of using RF connections?

    Is there any less lag with RF versus composite or S? I can't think of any real advantage of using RF whatsoever besides being the most readily available considering all the RF adapters that are floating around out there. Besides nostalgia, is there any real purpose to still be using it if your TV allows composite?

  2. #2
    ServBot (Level 11) jb143's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,939
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    4
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    30
    Thanked in
    29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    Is there any less lag with RF versus composite or S? I can't think of any real advantage of using RF whatsoever besides being the most readily available considering all the RF adapters that are floating around out there. Besides nostalgia, is there any real purpose to still be using it if your TV allows composite?
    The only reason to use RF is if that's all the TV has. In RF, the video and audio is on the same signal and needs filtered out. Then the video signal was further filtered into the RGB signals to drive the electron guns. This causes interference rather than lag, or if it did cause lag it would completely imperceivable. A little bit of the audio signal is mixed in with the video, a little of the red is mixed in with the green, etc... So it doesn't look or sound as clear as it could.



    For composite the audio is on a separate signal so it's going to look better but the TV still has to filter out the RGB into separate signals. At this point it's up the set. I've got a late model Trinitron that has one of the best comb filters I've ever seen and looks just as good as S-Video on other sets. Most aren't going to look quite that good, especially budget TVs, but it's still a step up from RF.

    S-Video further separates the video signal so there's even less interference. And then RGB (or component) give you pure signals for the best image.

    But lag really only comes into play for digital. It's takes time to process a digital signal while analog happens pretty instantaneously.

    As far as using RF though, if it's an older system that uses a switch box, get an "F" adapter instead. It will get rid of a lot of the noise you often see on older systems, Atari 2600, Intellivision, and the like.
    "Game programmers are generally lazy individuals. That's right. It's true. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Since the dawn of computer games, game programmers have looked for shortcuts to coolness." Kurt Arnlund - Game programmer for Activision, Accolade...

  3. #3
    Ghostbuster
    Greg2600's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Soprano Land, NJ
    Posts
    3,367
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    8 Posts

    Default

    Intellivision has really good RF output, as does the Commodore 64. Most others do not. However, if you don't wish to mod your old Atari systems let's say, then go with RF.
    The Paunch Stevenson Show free Internet podcast - www.paunchstevenson.com - DP FEEDBACK

  4. #4
    Strawberry (Level 2)
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    432
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    16
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jb143 View Post
    The only reason to use RF is if that's all the TV has. In RF, the video and audio is on the same signal and needs filtered out. Then the video signal was further filtered into the RGB signals to drive the electron guns. This causes interference rather than lag, or if it did cause lag it would completely imperceivable. A little bit of the audio signal is mixed in with the video, a little of the red is mixed in with the green, etc... So it doesn't look or sound as clear as it could.

    For composite the audio is on a separate signal so it's going to look better but the TV still has to filter out the RGB into separate signals. At this point it's up the set. I've got a late model Trinitron that has one of the best comb filters I've ever seen and looks just as good as S-Video on other sets. Most aren't going to look quite that good, especially budget TVs, but it's still a step up from RF.

    S-Video further separates the video signal so there's even less interference. And then RGB (or component) give you pure signals for the best image.

    But lag really only comes into play for digital. It's takes time to process a digital signal while analog happens pretty instantaneously.

    As far as using RF though, if it's an older system that uses a switch box, get an "F" adapter instead. It will get rid of a lot of the noise you often see on older systems, Atari 2600, Intellivision, and the like.
    I just got a Trinitron that was sitting outside my dumpster. All I can tell you is it has S, composite, RF. I'm wondering if we have the same model. This one is a KV-27S26

  5. #5
    ServBot (Level 11) jb143's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,939
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    4
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    30
    Thanked in
    29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    I just got a Trinitron that was sitting outside my dumpster. All I can tell you is it has S, composite, RF. I'm wondering if we have the same model. This one is a KV-27S26
    I got mine free off craigslist. I don't remember the model number but I was a bit bummed out it didn't have S-video. Until I saw just how clear the composite image was.

    It didn't really end up mattering anyways since I modded it for RGB to use as an arcade monitor.


    Quote Originally Posted by Greg2600 View Post
    Intellivision has really good RF output, as does the Commodore 64. Most others do not. However, if you don't wish to mod your old Atari systems let's say, then go with RF.
    Even for Intellivision using an "F" adapter is recommended for a cleaner signal.
    Last edited by jb143; 11-09-2018 at 05:52 PM.
    "Game programmers are generally lazy individuals. That's right. It's true. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Since the dawn of computer games, game programmers have looked for shortcuts to coolness." Kurt Arnlund - Game programmer for Activision, Accolade...

  6. #6
    Strawberry (Level 2)
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    432
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    16
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default

    I just played my NES using S video. Looked great. Only problem I have is that the overscan gets cut off. I wonder if there's anyway to shrink the picture so I can see every pixel

  7. #7
    ServBot (Level 11) jb143's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,939
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    4
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    30
    Thanked in
    29 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    I just played my NES using S video. Looked great. Only problem I have is that the overscan gets cut off. I wonder if there's anyway to shrink the picture so I can see every pixel
    You can get into the service menu and adjust that stuff. I don't remember the exact procedure but it's in the service manual which you can find online by searching for the model number. You do need the remote though. It's just a sequence of button presses. And if you change anything be sure to write down what it was first so you can put it back.

    Edit...
    There's also videos on youtube that show how to do it. Here's the first one I ran across that seems to do a decent job explaining what to do.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrMqRI-OhUQ
    Last edited by jb143; 11-09-2018 at 11:28 PM.
    "Game programmers are generally lazy individuals. That's right. It's true. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Since the dawn of computer games, game programmers have looked for shortcuts to coolness." Kurt Arnlund - Game programmer for Activision, Accolade...

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to jb143 For This Useful Post:

    gbpxl (11-10-2018)

  9. #8
    Strawberry (Level 2)
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    432
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    16
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    18
    Thanked in
    14 Posts

    Default

    I really feel like if one wants to relive that true 90s experience, the game has to be played on a tube TV, and I'll even go one step further and say, no modding, no everdrice or third party controllers. Nothing beats that feeling for me. I know I'm in the minority here but I've always been a purist. I play partly for nostalgia but also because the games were designed for 80s and 90s TVs. I don't believe the manufacturers really expected people to still be playing those cartridges 30 years later. This is evidenced in the fact that games had a 90 day warranty as well as the claim that the battery in the game paks should last several years.

    I've never gotten used to seeing the 8 bit graphics on a 4K TV and it frankly looks like crap in my opinion, even with the scanlines added in. The best one can do is shrink the picture, add scanlines and turn the sharpness down, and it looks ok at that point

Similar Threads

  1. JVC X-Eye and Genesis Connections
    By The 1 2 P in forum Technical and Restoration Society
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-19-2008, 11:26 PM
  2. Your A/V Connections
    By alec006 in forum Classic Gaming
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-27-2005, 04:04 PM
  3. Colecovision RF connections
    By WordPlusNumber in forum Classic Gaming
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-24-2004, 04:09 PM
  4. 8 and 16 bit Connections
    By slip81 in forum Buying and Selling
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-04-2004, 07:23 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •