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Thread: 72-pin replacements devalue the NES- thoughts?

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    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
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    Default 72-pin replacements devalue the NES- thoughts?

    Opinion: There are two NESs for sale in front of me. One was opened and has an aftermarket 72 pin connector in it and the other was never opened and has the original 72 pin connector in it. I am willing to pay at least 25% more or so for the virgin console.

    I get so sick of seeing NESs advertised with the new pin as if that is a selling point. To me it just decreases the number of unadultered consoles floating around. Its really not hard to get the games to work if you clean the cartridge and the pin itself and try to insert it various ways.
    Bernie 2020

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    ServBot (Level 11) Edmond Dantes's Avatar
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    Just saying, I don't get your logic. Someone attempted repairs (which might even have been successful) and that's somehow a bad thing to you? You would prefer the console with original 30+ year old parts?

    Let me put it this way, would you feel the same way about a Game Gear with replaced capacitors vs original capacitors?

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    I do prefer an NES to have its original pins, as those replacements are junk and tend to wear out quick, leaving it in an even worse state than it was with the original pins, but that said, a working system is still better than one that doesn't work. Trust me, you can clean the absolute heck out of your NES and carts and still have it barely work if the pins are bent out of shape. I used to have an NES like that. And I don't expect every random person who has an NES to have the desire or know-how to open up their NES and bend the pins back into making a decent connection, so I can't blame people for opting for clones or replacement pins or what have you.

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    As long as it works and doesn't have a death-grip on the cart, I'd go for the deck with the new pins.

    Retro gamers and collectors are going have to realize that eventually, electronics on these consoles will fail. Even if never used, some components like certain capacitors will just dry out and could fail as soon as power is applied. Or plastic or wires could be brittle from just age. Our Ataris and NES decks aren't immortal. People will have to learn to or have someone repair their stuff or get modern equivalents.

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    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoshiM View Post
    As long as it works and doesn't have a death-grip on the cart, I'd go for the deck with the new pins.

    Retro gamers and collectors are going have to realize that eventually, electronics on these consoles will fail. Even if never used, some components like certain capacitors will just dry out and could fail as soon as power is applied. Or plastic or wires could be brittle from just age. Our Ataris and NES decks aren't immortal. People will have to learn to or have someone repair their stuff or get modern equivalents.
    The problem is that most the aftermarket pins Ive used and the clone consoles all had death grips, or at least felt awkward going in. I want my NES to feel like two golden retrievers in the throes of love making, not a great dane going at it with a Yorkshire terrier
    Bernie 2020

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    If you "boil the connector" it removes the gunk from the pins. True it doesn't fix them completely, but I bought a new 72-ZIF, used it. Boiled my original connector, and threw the new one away.
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    Pear (Level 6) gbpxl's Avatar
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    How much of that was actually removing the gunk rather than simply improving conductivity
    Bernie 2020

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    Great Puma (Level 12) YoshiM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    The problem is that most the aftermarket pins Ive used and the clone consoles all had death grips, or at least felt awkward going in. I want my NES to feel like two golden retrievers in the throes of love making, not a great dane going at it with a Yorkshire terrier
    Do you actually play NES games or just like inserting and pulling out the cartridge repeatedly? ;-)

    If that's the case (wanting the ZIF experience), learn to refurbish the pins or find someone selling actual OEM NES pins. I bought new OEM pins and cart insertion was like 1988 all over again. Pin refurbishing is a pain but with practice can yield good results.

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    I bent pins on an original and afterwards it had a deathgrip like a... well nevermind

    Anyways i use an old worn out NES now and shes not as tight as the ones that had surgery but she gets the job done and still very fun to play with
    Last edited by gbpxl; 05-17-2019 at 03:12 PM.
    Bernie 2020

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    Generally, I prefer a working NES to a non-working one, regardless of how it's made to work. I personally have had decent luck re-bending the pins in one of my NESes, so I haven't tried any of the aftermarket 72-pin connectors, but I can see why some folks use them. If I had a NES in which the connector appeared to be physically dirty, I'd probably apply DeOxit before I tried anything along the lines of 'boiling', as that sounds like it might do more harm than good.
    -Adam
    Last edited by AdamAnt316; 05-17-2019 at 04:36 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by YoshiM View Post
    Our Ataris and NES decks aren't immortal.
    Yours aren't.

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    yea mine are, plus several lifetimes of spare parts from outside death causing events.
    like the sudden heat death of the universe.

    i'd pay 25% more for virgin things too but we might be getting off topic here.

    if the connector isnt pulling the PCB from the cart when you remove the game then it isnt a problem., also people dont replace them for no reason either.
    i tried everything to make the one in my sharp nes tv come back to life but it had dr mario in there for too many decades and when i cracked it loose (literally had to break the bonds betweeen the metals from contact corrosion) it just wouldnt do it in a reliable way. It'll get a blinking light win when ever i get brave enough to crack it open again.

    i am sure blinking light wins are taboo in your book too

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    Quote Originally Posted by Niku-Sama View Post
    yea mine are, plus several lifetimes of spare parts from outside death causing events.
    like the sudden heat death of the universe.

    i'd pay 25% more for virgin things too but we might be getting off topic here.

    if the connector isnt pulling the PCB from the cart when you remove the game then it isnt a problem., also people dont replace them for no reason either.
    i tried everything to make the one in my sharp nes tv come back to life but it had dr mario in there for too many decades and when i cracked it loose (literally had to break the bonds betweeen the metals from contact corrosion) it just wouldnt do it in a reliable way. It'll get a blinking light win when ever i get brave enough to crack it open again.

    i am sure blinking light wins are taboo in your book too
    I want the system to work first and foremost. If replacing something is necessary to achieve that, then fine. But a working NES with all original components is much more desirable to me.

    The BLW to me is like putting a 2019 Corvette engine in a 1985 Corvette. Will it make it better yeah, but Id rather have the '85 motor
    Bernie 2020

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    Personally I would avoid any NES system with a replacement pin connector unless it was dirt cheap and I wouldn't plan on keeping it. The replacement connectors are pretty much junk. I've used cleaning kits on used systems and got the original connectors to work close to new, I wouldn't bother replacing pins.

    As for the Sharp NES TV mentioned above, if I had to replace the connector I would salvage one from a regular NES system so it would still be original. Maybe that's just me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gameguy View Post
    Personally I would avoid any NES system with a replacement pin connector unless it was dirt cheap and I wouldn't plan on keeping it. The replacement connectors are pretty much junk. I've used cleaning kits on used systems and got the original connectors to work close to new, I wouldn't bother replacing pins.

    As for the Sharp NES TV mentioned above, if I had to replace the connector I would salvage one from a regular NES system so it would still be original. Maybe that's just me.
    To me, replacing a 72-pin connector in an NES with the 72-pin connector from another NES would be akin to replacing the engine in a Chevy Vega with the exact same engine from another Chevy Vega. It may work at first (if you're lucky), but will be far too likely to break down again in the same manner before too long. As I said above, if it were a question of having something be original or having something work, I'd go with the latter every time. There's no sense in having something be completely original if it means it'll just sit on a shelf not working.
    -Adam

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamAnt316 View Post
    To me, replacing a 72-pin connector in an NES with the 72-pin connector from another NES would be akin to replacing the engine in a Chevy Vega with the exact same engine from another Chevy Vega. It may work at first (if you're lucky), but will be far too likely to break down again in the same manner before too long. As I said above, if it were a question of having something be original or having something work, I'd go with the latter every time. There's no sense in having something be completely original if it means it'll just sit on a shelf not working.
    -Adam
    I still remember when I went to a game store and someone brought their NES console in for repair, as a game was stuck in the system and couldn't be removed because it had a new pin connector with a death grip.

    To me a replacement 3rd party connector is equivalent to replacing a cell phone or laptop battery with a cheap off brand replacement that either doesn't hold a charge as long, or tends to catch on fire or explode. Maybe there are some good quality replacements available but I have no idea how to sort them out from all the garbage ones when searching online.

    I've used cleaning kits made by Gemini and after cleaning for 5-10 minutes, they work fine and usually start on the first try. Original connectors aren't usually dead even after being decades old. They require more occasional maintenance than other consoles but they're still usable.

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    I've seen this as well, where A LOT of NES systems for sale will say they replaced the pins and I always think that they probably just needed a good cleaning/re-bending instead. I guess I mostly just remember the stories (mainly on here) about how some of the replacements were way too tight.

    Now for parts like caps and batteries it makes sense to replace with new parts if needed, but even then, if someone else is doing it you have no idea the quality of the parts they used.
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    Your '85 Corvette motor would either have been rebuilt at least once (probably twice) to be in proper working condition unless it was a 'pretty' show car, which means it needs a rebuild now. At least half of the 'permanent' things around it would have been replaced; the alternator, the master cylinder for the brakes, any thing with the word 'pump' in it, probably the solenoid for the starter and the IM for the distributor (if not the whole thing for both). This is on top of normal, consumer-level maintenance (oil changes, brake replacement, etc.). The good news that we're dealing with Chevy parts, and that 2019 engine would be an improvement and likely more economical in the long run.
    RPGs: Proof that one you start done the dork path, forever will it dominate your wallet's destiny.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WulfeLuer View Post
    Your '85 Corvette motor would either have been rebuilt at least once (probably twice) to be in proper working condition unless it was a 'pretty' show car, which means it needs a rebuild now. At least half of the 'permanent' things around it would have been replaced; the alternator, the master cylinder for the brakes, any thing with the word 'pump' in it, probably the solenoid for the starter and the IM for the distributor (if not the whole thing for both). This is on top of normal, consumer-level maintenance (oil changes, brake replacement, etc.). The good news that we're dealing with Chevy parts, and that 2019 engine would be an improvement and likely more economical in the long run.
    Which is more expensive? The '85 with zero miles and all original parts that need replacing or the '85 with zero miles and has all new parts under the hood
    Bernie 2020

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    The one with all new parts. A car enthusiast would pay a pretty penny for the first, but then probably rip out lots of things and put in all new plus probably some aftermarket, especially if he wants to drive the thing, and that would affect his offer. The second is nothing more than a immobile conversation piece that has been upgraded with lots of shiny toys, but overfinanced idiots love such things, and will throw more money at it. Even more if the seller can produce a list of the shiny new toys, and even more if they can produce a list of the shiny toys that were replaced.
    RPGs: Proof that one you start done the dork path, forever will it dominate your wallet's destiny.

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