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Thread: How do you keep track of your video game passwords?

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    Pear (Level 6)
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    Default How do you keep track of your video game passwords?

    I have a bad habit of losing track of passwords. What usually works best for me is taking a picture of the screen with my phone and then when I want to go back to that game I will go through my gallery and look for the newest photo of that particular game.

    I used to keep track of them in a notebook and then just cross out the old password once I wrote the newest one down but I tend to lose notebooks. The phone rarely gets lost since it is essentially another component of my body at this point, sadly.
    "I used to think my life was a tragedy, but now I realize it's a comedy." - Joker

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    Peach (Level 3)
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    I have a bad habit of losing track of passwords. What usually works best for me is taking a picture of the screen with my phone and then when I want to go back to that game I will go through my gallery and look for the newest photo of that particular game.
    This is what I do. And when I save a newer password, I delete the older pic.

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    I guess I'm old-fashioned, since I just jot them down on a piece of paper. I have cases for most of my handhelds, so if it's handheld game, I just keep the paper in the case. If it's a home console game, I just leave the paper near the system. I haven't ever had a problem with losing my passwords. I also have never had a problem with copying down a password wrong, even though people have been complaining for decades about writing down passwords that then don't work. Maybe it's my nature as a proofreader, but I always copy them carefully and double-check before I turn the game off.

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    Pear (Level 6)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie2B View Post
    I guess I'm old-fashioned, since I just jot them down on a piece of paper. I have cases for most of my handhelds, so if it's handheld game, I just keep the paper in the case. If it's a home console game, I just leave the paper near the system. I haven't ever had a problem with losing my passwords. I also have never had a problem with copying down a password wrong, even though people have been complaining for decades about writing down passwords that then don't work. Maybe it's my nature as a proofreader, but I always copy them carefully and double-check before I turn the game off.
    A lot of games left characters like O, I, l, 1, 0 for that exact reason. Thats one reason I take a photo so theres no doubt in my mind I am typing the right character. I also would have a hard time writing down the passwords for Boogerman or Castlevania 3
    "I used to think my life was a tragedy, but now I realize it's a comedy." - Joker

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    Pear (Level 6) DefaultGen's Avatar
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    I have a notes section in my collection spreadsheet, I put any passwords in there. I rarely give up on a game and come back to it later with a password though, I just start over if it's been so long that I've lost my phone pictures. Most games that use passwords aren't very long, even something like Metroid is pretty feasible to just start over and breeze through the beginning now that you have your old experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbpxl View Post
    A lot of games left characters like O, I, l, 1, 0 for that exact reason. Thats one reason I take a photo so theres no doubt in my mind I am typing the right character. I also would have a hard time writing down the passwords for Boogerman or Castlevania 3
    That's another thing I have to have a sharp eye for when proofreading, to tell the difference between zeroes and O's and ones, L's, and I's that are serifed or not. So I make sure I understand the font of a game before I copy a password, and I'll write the password in a way I know I'll understand later. Normally, I don't write zeroes and O's any differently, but if there's any chance for confusion, I'll put a diagonal slash through zeroes. And ones I normally write as just a straight line, but I'll add the hook and bottom line if needed to be clear.

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    Cherry (Level 1) WulfeLuer's Avatar
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    Kudos for actually knowing a serif is and how to use it.

    In all honesty if it's a linear string of ten or less characters I can keep in my head reliably for a while, twelve if its all numbers. Not because I'm special, but because remembering a string of ten characters--read, a phone number--was a taught survival skill, a string of twelve--read, a UPC code--is something you pick up at work after a while. Anything more complex gets written down.

    My big hang up was always the more complex Mega Man passwords; not the Battleship-like dot based ones, but the letter-and-blank grids from the later GB games. Those things are EVIL, even if you write them down.
    RPGs: Proof that one you start done the dork path, forever will it dominate your wallet's destiny.

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    Cherry (Level 1)
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    Paper for short passwords, camera or phone for longer ones (or ones that get into weird non-alphanumeric characters).

    With long passwords it's too easy to make a mistake, and there are games like Lord of the Rings Vol. 1 on SNES that actually give you passwords that don't work, so having an image of the screen is a good way to keep from losing your mind!

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    Somewhere in a folder I have some old Faxanadu passwords and I either entered one incorrectly that somehow worked, or my game glitches when it was dirty and I managed to end up with one where I had infinite Elixirs taking up an item slot. Like I could equip the Elixir as an item and use it and it wouldn't disappear. I'm pretty sure I posted it somewhere but am not 100% sure.

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