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Thread: CRT screen repair?

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    Default CRT screen repair?

    Does anyone know if chips or nicks can be fixed on curved glass screens on CRT televisions? I figured if they can do it on car windshields, they could do it on TVs, right?
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    Alex (Level 15) Custom rank graphic
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    When a windshield gets repaired, they add adhesive so the chip won't spread or get larger. The chip doesn't go away, and sometimes applying the adhesive can break the windshield as pressure is used to spread it into the defect.

    So no, you can't repair a chip in a glass CRT screen. That noticeable defect will stay visible.

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    Depends on the depth of the chip, polishing the glass could be possible to smooth it out. I've read of people buffing out noticeable gouges and scratches with cerium oxide but it takes hours and hours by hand, and still a considerable length of time with a powered buffing wheel.

    Supposedly the optical properties of glass is very forgiving, and for the considerations of x-ray shielding and implosion resistance the glass layer of a tube's supposed to be very thick. I've never tried to do such a repair myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gameguy View Post
    When a windshield gets repaired, they add adhesive so the chip won't spread or get larger. The chip doesn't go away, and sometimes applying the adhesive can break the windshield as pressure is used to spread it into the defect.
    Completely different application, windshields are subject to extreme temperature variations and the mechanical vibration of a car, plus the buffeting pressure of wind at highway speeds. If you can find a windshield/headlight repair technician bold enough to give it a try, you could probably bribe them into buffing out a defect in a CRT tube.

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    I somehow managed to move my CRT up 3 flights of stairs by myself without damaging it. I could go the rest of my life without ever having to move it again
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bratwurst View Post
    Depends on the depth of the chip, polishing the glass could be possible to smooth it out. I've read of people buffing out noticeable gouges and scratches with cerium oxide but it takes hours and hours by hand, and still a considerable length of time with a powered buffing wheel.

    Supposedly the optical properties of glass is very forgiving, and for the considerations of x-ray shielding and implosion resistance the glass layer of a tube's supposed to be very thick. I've never tried to do such a repair myself.
    I've learned something new, so thanks. I assumed that the glass couldn't be polished to remove chips on a CRT as it would affect the strength of the glass and could possibly cause the tube to implode, I guess it might be possible after all. Scratches are different than chips though, light scratches could be polished out. The original post just mentioned chips and gouges, and windshields which is why I briefly talked about them.

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    i had a bullseye chip in an otherwise perfect trinitron computer monitor, its repairable but i was always afraid of it imploding on me.

    now a days instead of forcing the glue into the chip they suck the air out and let the suction and surface tension pull it back in and fill it, i'd be a bit more comfortable with that but that monitor is long gone now

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