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Thread: Question about Super Famicom and AC Power Adapters

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Default Question about Super Famicom and AC Power Adapters

    Well, I recently bought a Super Famicom for a decent price. However, instead of a proper Super Famicom AC Adapter, I got the Australian PAL AC Adapter instead.

    As you might know, US and Japan uses 100v (or 110v?) voltages while countries such as mine and others use, I think it was, 210v or 220v.

    Using the PAL AC Adapter will fry my SFC right?

    If so, then I'd have to buy a different AC Adapter. Would an AC Power Adapter for use with an American Super Nintendo work with my Super Famicom?

    Or must I specifically buy a Japanese AC Adapter instead?

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    Cherry (Level 1) Kamisama's Avatar
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    a PAL Snes Adapter will blow your SFC away with 220V
    You should buy a stepdown converter like this one. Although this one is for the UK now.

    A japanese Adapter wont work i guess as its not compatible with the 220V aswell.

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamisama
    a PAL Snes Adapter will blow your SFC away with 220V
    ^_^;;

    You should buy a stepdown converter like this one. Although this one is for the UK now.

    A japanese Adapter wont work i guess as its not compatible with the 220V aswell.
    Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that I already have a 100w Step Down Transformer (using American/Japanese appliances in 220v countries).

    Hmm, what do you mean the Japanese adapter won't work?

    I guess my plan now is to buy a Japanese (or US, can anyone confirm if I can use it?) power adapter, plug that adapter into the transformer, and plug the transformer to the power outlet. Same thing I do with my Japanese PS2.

    By the way, just out of curiosity, what happens if you take a 220v console to 110v America, and plug it in without a Step Up Transformer?

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    Pac-Man (Level 10) FABombjoy's Avatar
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    Game consoles have power requirements like 9V, 12V, 5V, not 220V

    If the OUTPUT of the power adapter is correct for a Super Famicom, and you live in a 220V country, then a 220V power supply will work fine.

    You really don't need a step up/down, provided that you can find comperable supplies with your own country's input voltage... Unless you're using a console with a built-in supply (PC-FX), or something truly weird (Neo Geo CD)

    By the way, just out of curiosity, what happens if you take a 220v console to 110v America, and plug it in without a Step Up Transformer?
    The device will receive inadequate power to operate. Fire may ensue. You'll also have to replace the outlet because it would take nothing short of a sledgehammer to insert a 220 plug into a 110 outlet

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    I don't need a step down huh?

    Here's all the info I can give so if anyone could help me decide on the best course of action, I'd appreciate it.

    Super Famicom model SHVC-001
    On the back where the power adapter should be plugged, it is marked "DC

    When I bought my Super Famicom, it came with an AC Power Adapter:

    "AUS" (Australian)
    Input: AC240v 50Hz 17W
    Output: AC9v 1.3A
    This is a PAL Nintendo (Not Super Nintendo) power adapter.

    Australia uses 220v (or thereabouts) for its appliances.

    I also have a PAL SNES power adapter with similar specs, which I assume won't work with the Famicom.

    Now, according to this thread...

    http://ntsc-uk.domino.org/showthread.php?t=50065

    there is speculation that a PAL Nintendo (not SNES) PSU (the one I got with my SFC) would actually work with a Super Famicom (without needing step down transformer).

    I'd try it out, if it didn't mean risking my SFC getting fried... x_x

    Anyway, if anyone can help me out here, I'd really appreciate it.

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    Pac-Man (Level 10) FABombjoy's Avatar
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    It sounds like the SFC needs a DC-output power adapter, but you have an AC-output adapter. If so, then I wouldn't use it.

    If you can locate a 220V adapter that works with the SFC, I'd use that before investing in a step-down. Unless you plan on using more than a few 110V (US) or 100V (Japan) adapter, it will probably cost more to purchase a step-down transformer AND import a 100V adapter.

    I have a few import consoles as well, and whenever possible I just find a similar US-market power adapter - unless it's built-in or just too strange to find (like my previous examples). For those I have a 110V -> 100V step down.

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    I suppose using AC Adapter into a DC port is possibly not a good idea.

    On the other hand, the people at NTSC-UK forums claim that a UK Sega Mega Drive 1 Power Supply Unit would work fine with a SFC. Which I just happen to have, and which also happens to be still an AC, not a DC.

    Even though both the UK and Australia are "PAL" countries, I am unsure if the SMD PSU designs are the same.

    Well, after I get my account validated there, hopefully they can help me determine beyond a doubt what works and what doesn't work.

    Importing proved to be a bit tougher than I thought...

    NTSC, PAL, watts, AC, DC, voltage, different shaped plugs... JUST CONFORM DAMMIT!!!11

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    Pac-Man (Level 10) FABombjoy's Avatar
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    The MD1 adapter is AC? Really?

    They're all AC input, but check to make sure it's not DC output. For example, a US Genesis adapter is 110V AC In, 9V DC out. If the supply has the polarity diagram then you know for sure that it's DC. Something like:

    + ---(o--- -

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    Here's the specifics...

    AS N/11921
    MODEL NO: 1602-03
    AC ADAPTOR FOR USE WITH MEGA DRIVE
    INPUT: 250V ~ 50Hz 19W
    OUTPUT: 10V - 1.2A

    (+) ----(o---- (-)

    I don't undestand this positive/negative polarity thing actually.

    So what do you think this means?

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Oops, meant to be 240V not 250V.

    Prongs for it, are of course like this / \, unlike NTSC prongs which are like this | |

    Another piece of information I gleaned from the same forums, is that apparently Nintendo/Super Nintendo power adaptors (or is it adapters) don't require step down transformers; the PSUs themselves act as step downs. Not sure if this is true or not.

    And where is the "edit post" function.

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    ServBot (Level 11) Niku-Sama's Avatar
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    i dont know if this helps at all but...

    when i got my super famicom from japangamestock.com i used the ac adaptor that came with it for a while but since i ran out of plugs i put the japanese one away and started using my US NES ac adaptor, it has about the same out put and it worked.

    couldnt use an SNES ac adaptor since for some reason our SNES and the SFC have different plugs on the console. the NES plug fits though (and works)

    if i rember correctly the NES adaptor supplied LESS power than the SFC did but it wasnt much different. electronics have an acceptable range of supplied power that they can mantain a usable operation on. as a note though you usually safer with a LOWER supplied power than a higher one for obvious reasons, if its not enough it just wont work.

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niku-Sama
    i dont know if this helps at all but...

    when i got my super famicom from japangamestock.com i used the ac adaptor that came with it for a while but since i ran out of plugs i put the japanese one away and started using my US NES ac adaptor, it has about the same out put and it worked.

    couldnt use an SNES ac adaptor since for some reason our SNES and the SFC have different plugs on the console. the NES plug fits though (and works)

    if i rember correctly the NES adaptor supplied LESS power than the SFC did but it wasnt much different. electronics have an acceptable range of supplied power that they can mantain a usable operation on. as a note though you usually safer with a LOWER supplied power than a higher one for obvious reasons, if its not enough it just wont work.
    The US SNES for some reason, has a slightly different shaped connector at the back compared to the UK SNES and SFC (SFC and UK SNES has same shaped connectors).

    Yeah, electronic appliances do indeed alternate between peaks and troughs but remain within an acceptable range.

    e.g. My Step Down is a 220v-115v. A 220v-110v is recommended, but mine works anyway.

    The thing I'm worried about however, is the differences that exist in the power outlet (i.e. UK and I uses 220v, America/Japan uses 110v). So basically, I don't think you need to worry about that, but it is a factor for us.

    In any case, for anyone who is interested, I've made a thread here seeking further assistance:

    http://ntsc-uk.domino.org/showthread.php?p=942748

    Thanks.

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    First off, I would like to say, that from what I know, the power adaptors should act as your step-downs for ya. Videogame systems run on very low voltages, like below 20V, all around the world while the outlets they plug into spit out between 100V and 250V or so (various points around the world), so the adaptors act as your step-downs.

    Secondly, I heard talking above about NES and Genesis (or Mega-Drive) power adaptors. I know in America, the NES power adaptors take AC and output AC that the system will convert on the inside to DC while the Genesis adaptors take AC and output DC so that the system has what it needs when the power reaches it and it wont have to convert. Now then, both systems run on about the same level of DC power in the end, so it is perfectly safe and works to use the Genesis adaptors on either system (this way the NES will get its DC power and not have to convert it and basicly just lets it run on through to the system), however, it is NOT safe to use a NES adaptor on a Genesis as the AC power will FRY the system on the inside and it will be GONE!

    So, if your SNES says it needs DC power inputed into it, I would NOT use the AC power that comes from a NES power adaptor (note: I dont have a SNES or SF, so I dont know all the technical specks for the things).

    Im sure there was something else I wanted to say, but I cant remember, but good luck to ya and I hope you get that thing working and not fried.
    I will get around to editing this thing again.

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    Pac-Man (Level 10) FABombjoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperShark
    First off, I would like to say, that from what I know, the power adaptors should act as your step-downs for ya. Videogame systems run on very low voltages, like below 20V, all around the world while the outlets they plug into spit out between 100V and 250V or so (various points around the world), so the adaptors act as your step-downs.
    Technically you are correct. By the very definition, something that takes, for example, 110V and turns it into 9V is a step-down transformer.

    However, in the context of worldly electronics, a step-down (or step-up) transformer is a device that converts global voltage standards.

    A lot of devices now use power adapters with 100-240V inputs. ONLY THOSE are safe to plug in "worldly" without a step-up/down transformer.

    Plugging a plain-old 110V adapter into a 220V outlet will probably make fire. Plugging a 220V adapter into a 110V outlet will underpower the device and still maybe break something.

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    drowning in medals Ed Oscuro's Avatar
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    It's also worth mentioning that using japanese power supplies on US current will likely reduce their life span. If you can safely swap a Japanese power supply with a domestic one, always do it!

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Hey, I just tested my SFC and a few games (Estpolis Denki II, Seiken Densetsu 2, Ys III) with an AUS SMD1 PSU and it worked fine, just fine.

    So glad it didn't blow up! And it would have been a shame if it did, since I got it for the low price of approximately $45USD (shipping included). It included a good condition console (no yellowing), 2 controllers, and A/V cable.

    Cheerio.

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    Strawberry (Level 2)
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    Quote Originally Posted by FABombjoy
    Quote Originally Posted by SuperShark
    First off, I would like to say, that from what I know, the power adaptors should act as your step-downs for ya. Videogame systems run on very low voltages, like below 20V, all around the world while the outlets they plug into spit out between 100V and 250V or so (various points around the world), so the adaptors act as your step-downs.
    Technically you are correct. By the very definition, something that takes, for example, 110V and turns it into 9V is a step-down transformer.

    However, in the context of worldly electronics, a step-down (or step-up) transformer is a device that converts global voltage standards.

    A lot of devices now use power adapters with 100-240V inputs. ONLY THOSE are safe to plug in "worldly" without a step-up/down transformer.

    Plugging a plain-old 110V adapter into a 220V outlet will probably make fire. Plugging a 220V adapter into a 110V outlet will underpower the device and still maybe break something.
    Well I would think that that would all be common sense, that last 2 paragraphs that is, but I guess maybe I want clear enough.


    And layzee, good 4 ya! Happy everything worked out well 4 you.
    I will get around to editing this thing again.

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    This is the internet.


    assume nothing.

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    Cherry (Level 1) layzee's Avatar
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    Just some interesting little info:

    The seller of my Super Famicom claimed that the PAL NES AC Adapter would indeed work with an NTSC-JP DC Input Super Famicom.

    Exact words:

    The power adaptor that came with the other famicom system that sold originally was 10.5v output,the adaptor i sent you is 12v output but it should have worked fine,i rang up a games technician and he said it would have been ok.
    I also mentioned another person on another forum (see my above posts) who also enquired whether that would work.

    I'm not about to try it though without proof...

    Actually, I'm not gonna try it at all. I'd just be asking for more trouble.

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    Strawberry (Level 2) phreak97's Avatar
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    i didnt read half the posts so this might have already been said, but you CANNOT use an australian adaptor in a super famicom. not cos of the 240v or 110v or any of that. just simply because the sfc is 10VDC and the au snes is 9VAC. if you plug AC into a dc unit you'll more than likely blow the crap out of it instantly. that and im not sure if itll even fit. a us snes adaptor has a completely different socket, so that definately wont fit.. i recommend getting a real sfc adaptor. having said that, you can get a 10vdc adaptor from dick smiths or something so long as it is either 850mA or over.. just make sure the outside is positive and the centre pole is negative + ---(o--- - it will have that printed on it.. either that or itll have bits you can remove and put whichever way around you need.

    btw, i have snes consoles from australia, japan, and america.. and it's fair useless trying to use one region power cable on another region console.

    Have Fun!

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