Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: What influential game developer do you admire most?

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Bell (Level 8)
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,739
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    84
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    74
    Thanked in
    70 Posts

    Default What influential game developer do you admire most?

    There are dozens of people in the industry who are basically household names at this point; Shigeru Miyamoto, Hideo Kojima, Yu Suzuki, Ralph Baer, Bill Gates, Trip Hawkins, Ed Boon, etc. All of them have brought something unique to the world of gaming but is there any single developer you have the most admiration and/or respect for?

    I have to go with Eugene Jarvis. Robotron and Crusin are two of my favorite games. The kind of games he has been involved in are the type of games I like. short, quick, easy to play. I didnt realize it but he actually owns Raw Thrills which is one of the few companies that is still putting out arcade games like Jurassic Park, Nerf Arcade, and H2Overdrive. He never sold out and started designing mobile games as a lot of developers end up doing.

    Secondly I have to go with Yu Suzuki. He really dominated the Japanese arcade scene in the 80s. and kept the memories alive through 80s simulators Shenmue 1 and 2.

    Of course Miyamoto is basically the reason video games became so widespread in the 80s. and for home consoles yes he was the king at the time. Im just not familiar with much of his work with arcade or pinball games and that is what interests me the most

    what are your favorite game developers or designers?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Moderator
    Custom rank graphic
    Aussie2B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    8,905
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    14
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    116
    Thanked in
    94 Posts

    Default

    As far as designers/directors/producers/programmers/etc. go, that's an easy choice for me: Gunpei Yokoi. He was effectively Miyamoto's mentor, invented the Game & Watch, D-pad, Game Boy, Virtual Boy, WonderSwan, and produced classic franchises like Metroid, Kid Icarus, Fire Emblem, Dr. Mario, Wario Land, etc. And his reward for all his accomplishments was being driven out of Nintendo, blamed for the Virtual Boy's failure, and then he tragically died in a traffic accident only about a year later. He was a creative genius as far as I'm concerned, and I can only imagine what else he could've created had he not be robbed from this world in only his mid 50s. Whenever I beat a game with his involvement and see his name scroll by in the credits, I always feel a bit melancholy.

    Yoshiharu Gotanda is another important figure to me. He's the president and co-founder of tri-Ace, my favorite game development company. He's pretty brilliant in his own right, considering he was programming some great games under Wolf Team as early as his teens.

    I respect Hiroshi Matsuyama, the president and founder of CyberConnect2, for not only being behind many excellent games but for also seemingly being such a personable, upbeat guy who loves what he works on and loves the fans. I mean, you can't even Google Image search him without half the photos being of him cosplaying as Naruto, haha. I smile pretty much every time I see him.

    Lastly, I have a lot of admiration and respect for Dona Bailey, who not only co-created my favorite pre-crash game (Centipede) but had the courage to push herself into an industry that was not remotely welcoming to women. I can only imagine how much bullcrap she must've faced and how it must've felt as the sole woman in Atari's coin-op division. But I'm thankful she did it because she helped open the door for many others and having a woman's perspective resulted in a game that appealed to a broader audience than the average game at the time.

  3. #3
    Alex (Level 15) Custom rank graphic
    Gameguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Richmond Hill, Ontario (Canada)
    Posts
    7,327
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    40
    Thanked in
    34 Posts

    Default

    If we're talking about individual developers then I'll have to mention Ron Gilbert for pretty obvious reasons. Listening to him talk about the design processes he used when creating his various games like Maniac Mansion is pretty interesting, there's various videos on youtube if anyone want to look for them.

  4. #4
    Crono (Level 14) Custom rank graphic

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    6,613
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    13
    Thanked in
    13 Posts

    Default

    The problem with many Japanese developers in the past is that a lot of companies did not want people to steal their employees, so a lot of names were fake and there was usually no branding between most games. So it seemed the only ones with any noticeable exposure are the ones that had big careers within the company they worked for, whether that was contractual or what not, that prevented these developers from leaving. But if you were to play Castlevania or Mega Man X for instance, there's no telling who actually developed the games, but the group of less than 20 are all code names.

    There are a lot of devs such as Yu Suzuki and Hideo Kojima that spearheaded the development of many games, but they get branded for a lot of work that they actually never contributed to. Zone of Enders 1/2 and Castlevania Lords of Shadows are two instances where Hideo Kojima is commonly and incorrectly credited as creator of those games when he really had no such part. Keiji Inafune is often referred to as the creator of the Mega Man series, while he had nothing to do with the franchise outside of enemy designs up until Mega Man Legends which he consulted in the games development, yet the people behind the series are mostly unknown and have never got recognition for this.

    That being said, director's do have more influence over how the game ultimately turns out, so Hideo Kojima does atleast deserve some recognition, but it wasn't only him yet he's the one branded as being responsible. I would also like to point out that as many games that Yu Suzuki has been credited for, there is an absolutely astounding amount of mediocrity, unlike Miyamoto who is credited for an absurd amount of great Nintendo games. So maybe there is some truth behind the credit to these developers afterall? I mean, Final Fantasy has gone to crap lately with Hironobu Sakaguchi no longer at the helm, when is the last time a Final Fantasy titles general consensus was "amazing." So maybe Kojima isn't as overrated as I think.
    Everything in the above post is opinion unless stated otherwise.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Moderator
    Custom rank graphic
    Aussie2B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    8,905
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    14
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    116
    Thanked in
    94 Posts

    Default

    That's basically how it goes for any work created by a large collective. Pretty much no one memorizes the entire credits to their favorite movie, for example. You may know the director, lead actors, the composer, etc. but there isn't much attention paid to the more minor positions. Of course, everybody deserves credit for their contribution, hence why they're in the credits to begin with, but it makes sense why the individuals who had more impact get more of the acclaim. After all, a director directs everyone else to fulfill their vision. I think game fans could put in a lot more effort learning about the people behind the games they love, considering most still just credit the companies, even though a company may be outsourcing and/or have multiple internal development teams, but I wouldn't fault a fan for only knowing one or two key people.

  6. #6
    GET READY Custom rank graphic
    TimTendo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    30
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie2B View Post
    As far as designers/directors/producers/programmers/etc. go, that's an easy choice for me: Gunpei Yokoi. He was effectively Miyamoto's mentor, invented the Game & Watch, D-pad, Game Boy, Virtual Boy, WonderSwan, and produced classic franchises like Metroid, Kid Icarus, Fire Emblem, Dr. Mario, Wario Land, etc. And his reward for all his accomplishments was being driven out of Nintendo, blamed for the Virtual Boy's failure, and then he tragically died in a traffic accident only about a year later. He was a creative genius as far as I'm concerned, and I can only imagine what else he could've created had he not be robbed from this world in only his mid 50s. Whenever I beat a game with his involvement and see his name scroll by in the credits, I always feel a bit melancholy.
    Couldn't agree more. Yokoi-san was the unsung hero of Nintendo from the inception of the Game & Watch all the way up to his untimely death. His achievements and creations stretch far beyond merely "innovative" and go straight into "revolutionary". The work of his R&D1 team (game-wise) largely seem to make up the underdogs of the Nintendo canon; titles such as Kid Icarus or Wario Land seldom see an avalanche of entries every decade like other franchises, but maybe that's a good thing.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Moderator
    Custom rank graphic
    Aussie2B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    8,905
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    14
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    116
    Thanked in
    94 Posts

    Default

    I getting the feeling that maybe Nintendo hasn't touched many of Yokoi's franchises much out of respect after his death or maybe because there's just nobody at Nintendo with the same level of passion for those IPs as Yokoi had.

  8. #8
    Crono (Level 14) Custom rank graphic

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    6,613
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    13
    Thanked in
    13 Posts

    Default

    Anyways, I'll add to the thread. During my rant about it's one person making a name off the back of others, I mentioned Hironobu Sakaguchi. Now, while outside of video games Dungeons and Dragon's is the first RPG and Ultima is the first recognizable series(I don't know if it's the first game though,) it wasn't until Dragon Quest by Yuji Horii that video game RPGs became more enjoyable. Now, Dragon Warrior imo isn't a good game, because the game focused way too much on grinding with literally little to no content in between, but it was more appealing than Ultima which I played much later and just couldn't get into.

    However, it was because he was influenced by the Dragon Warrior series that Hironobu Sakaguchi made the Final Fantasy series, using many ideas from other RPGs out there at the time. The larger and customizable character roster and the more streamlined gameplay made Final Fantasy a more enjoyable RPG compared to the very limited Dragon Warrior or the unstructured western titles at the time. Despite a world not nearly as simplistic and obvious on where to go next as Dragon Warrior, it was simple where to go and what to do as long as you paid attention to the towns people you came across. The classes were well designed where you had melee fighters who were constant damage dealers and the charged spells from mages made the characters themselves weaker, but devastating compared to your main fighters when you decided to go all out. The original Final Fantasy despite being the first one in the series is also difficult, but even then one of the most balanced JRPGs requiring very little grinding and almost none at all depending on how well you know the game.

    It was games that were developed by Sakaguchi that continued to innovate the JRPG. Despite not liking Final Fantasy 3, the actual Final Fantasy 3, because this game is a ridiculous grind ontop of the requirement of very specific classes for each dungeon. All classes gained a unique aspect to them in how they functioned. Final Fantasy 5 took this further and allowed a lot of cross classing for a very large number of classes. All of the earlier games had a sort of class system as per character based, but it was Final Fantasy 3 and 5 that allowed more experimentation. Who knows who came up with the ATB system on Final Fantasy 4, but the reason why it hasn't been used anywhere else outside of Final Fantasy is because it was copyrighted by Square Enix, and Sakaguchi was director there too. There are versions of the ATB in Grandia and White Knight Chronicles, but there are major differences in how they function.

    If not for how good the Final Fantasy games are, and how big of a following the series has gained in both west and east, the RPG genre may not have been as big is it was in the golden era of JRPGs back in SNES and PS1. As Dragon Warrior and other RPGs inspired Final Fantasy, Final Fantasy, Chrono Trigger(which was actually a Squaresoft and Enix co developed title with Yuji Horii and Sakaguchi both part of the games development,) inspired many other RPGs and JRPGs. Breath of Fire 1 and 2 were developed but published by Squaresoft on the SNES, meaning it's quite obvious where they got their inspiration.

    That being said, everyone knows Sakaguchi.

    So how about Takashi Tokita, I only remember his name as a director on many Squaresoft JRPGs including Chrono Trigger and Parasite Eve because I make a joke about the name and spelling of it all the time(add the last name's letter to the end of the first name. *mind blow.* You can't unsee it.)
    Everything in the above post is opinion unless stated otherwise.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Moderator
    Custom rank graphic
    Aussie2B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    8,905
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    14
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    116
    Thanked in
    94 Posts

    Default

    There are probably millions of Japanese people who have a "shi" in their name followed by a character that starts with a "t" sound. It's hardly anything unusual. Technically, Takashi Tokita wouldn't even be an example because Japanese people write their names with the surname first, so it'd be Tokita Takashi to them. It'd make more sense to snicker at, say, Yoshitaka Amano's name, which one couldn't even write on GameFAQs back in the day because it was automatically flagged as cursing. But even then, in Japanese, there's no such thing as a "t" that exists by itself. The characters in Amano's given name are Yo-shi-ta-ka. But none of this really matters because making fun of anybody's name is immature to begin with, and making fun of a foreigner's name is ignorant on top of that.

Similar Threads

  1. Article on Top 10 Most Influential Amiga Games
    By robotriot in forum Classic Gaming
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-14-2007, 12:16 PM
  2. Most Influential Game on each System
    By boatofcar in forum Classic Gaming
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-03-2005, 02:10 PM
  3. Most Influential/Innovative Current Gan Console Games
    By Sylentwulf in forum Classic Gaming
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-25-2003, 11:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •