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Thread: Analogue's next new console: FPGA N64 in 2024

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SparTonberry View Post
    It would have to be emulation (or FPGA, which I guess can somehow not be emulation even though it isn't the original chips). I'd love to play with one since by the time I got a used Sega CD, it couldn't read discs (though I presume the hardware was otherwise working, it could still boot up the BIOS.) I lack the technical skill to fix that problem currently. But the prices on the capable flash carts are beyond my budget.
    I have no flash carts either for the same reasons, they're just too expensive for me to afford currently. I do have original Sega CD hardware but it's been years since I've used any of it so I'm not sure if it's still working properly, I'm hoping it is but I'll need to test it all again. I've just not been able to have any of my video game systems hooked up for various reasons so I'm just down to my PC and some portables currently. I'm really hoping I'll be able to play my Sega CD again soon, there's a lot of good games available for that platform.

    Still wish I would have bought a complete JVC X'Eye that was offered to me years ago. I was trying to limit my collection at the time due to space concerns so I didn't buy it, but it was priced very well compared to current pricing so it is a regret I have.

  2. #22
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    You can repair any CD-rom drive and does not require the high amount of tech skill outside of knowing
    which wire goes to which and soldering. I am sure there are guides on the subject. If people are repairing the dreamcast or even PS2 why not. In fact I own a PC-Engine CD-rom with matching system.
    It looks as if somebody did some kind of repair job because the CD-rom center does not pop, I had another system as well and that one was not working would pop up, and I was able to sell it high at the time ( guessing they would figure out how to repair it ).

    Quote Originally Posted by Gameguy View Post
    There are flash carts that can play Sega CD games on actual Sega Genesis hardware, I don't think they count as emulation but I'm not sure exactly how they run Sega CD games on standard Genesis hardware.
    CDs reads like Cassette tapes. In order for the data to be played it looks up the index, which is usually located on the inner-most-tracks and literally go to it's location by browsing the entire disc ( which looks like less then a second but is really a long time ).

    When you backup a Disc, you will most likely backing up as indivisual tracks with an index file used to
    look up the information on those tracks. Imagine.

    Game loads

    Data located on track 01

    Song/vocals located on 02 at 00.00.00 location.

    Most PC-Engine, SEGA-CD, Saturn, and some PSX games works this way. PSX actually can have games and various content in data-mode creating a multiple boot disc that works cross platform.

    Remove the audio/video content and your left with a file that is usally less then 50mb in most instances. The SFC/SNES had "Star Ocean" which is probably the biggest game on the system
    along side "Far East of Eden:Zero" that holds around 56-98mb of data. They had to have extra
    storage just to hold these games. Amazing fact that "Star Ocean" on the SFC is actually better in
    every other way then any other remake of the game as with "TOP"

    With a CD you can loads FMV, and Audio data with next to no compression.

    Games got bigger over time because of uncompressed data and larger bitmap files
    for the higher resolution and various media formats.
    Last edited by Gametrek; 02-22-2024 at 11:08 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gametrek View Post
    You can repair any CD-rom drive and does not require the high amount of tech skill outside of knowing
    which wire goes to which and soldering. I am sure there are guides on the subject. If people are repairing the dreamcast or even PS2 why not. In fact I own a PC-Engine CD-rom with matching system.
    It looks as if somebody did some kind of repair job because the CD-rom center does not pop, I had another system as well and that one was not working would pop up, and I was able to sell it high at the time ( guessing they would figure out how to repair it ).
    They're repairable as long as you can still get compatible lasers, different drives require different lasers.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gametrek View Post
    CDs reads like Cassette tapes. In order for the data to be played it looks up the index, which is usually located on the inner-most-tracks and literally go to it's location by browsing the entire disc ( which looks like less then a second but is really a long time ).

    When you backup a Disc, you will most likely backing up as indivisual tracks with an index file used to
    look up the information on those tracks. Imagine.

    Game loads

    Data located on track 01

    Song/vocals located on 02 at 00.00.00 location.

    Most PC-Engine, SEGA-CD, Saturn, and some PSX games works this way. PSX actually can have games and various content in data-mode creating a multiple boot disc that works cross platform.

    Remove the audio/video content and your left with a file that is usally less then 50mb in most instances. The SFC/SNES had "Star Ocean" which is probably the biggest game on the system
    along side "Far East of Eden:Zero" that holds around 56-98mb of data. They had to have extra
    storage just to hold these games. Amazing fact that "Star Ocean" on the SFC is actually better in
    every other way then any other remake of the game as with "TOP"

    With a CD you can loads FMV, and Audio data with next to no compression.

    Games got bigger over time because of uncompressed data and larger bitmap files
    for the higher resolution and various media formats.
    You are aware that a Sega CD add on contains more than just a CD drive to physically read a disc, aren't you? There's other electronic components including proprietary chips, audio circuitry, as well as a BIOS. Sega CD games aren't just standard Genesis games stored on a CD.

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